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Quercetin Anhydrous - ThinkitDrinkit
  • Quercetin Anhydrous - ThinkitDrinkit

Quercetin Anhydrous

$4.65

Quercetin is a flavanoid, a type of plant-based antioxidant. Studies suggest that quercetin can improve the amount of energy our cells can produce, by increasing the number of mitochondria, the “powerhouses” of the cell. Quercetin can deliver the long-lasting natural energy you need at home, work, and play. It also acts as an anti-inflammatory, to aid in the post-workout recovery process. Beyond its antioxidant properties, quercetin has been shown to improve endurance and performance in weekend warriors and elite athletes alike.

Servings: 15   Price Per Serving: $0.31

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  • Description
  • Additional Information
  • More Information Athletic Performance
  • More Information Natural Energy
  • Attributes
  • Reviews (0)

Product Description

*This statement has not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration.  This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.

Additional Information

Weight 7.88 g
Dimensions 4 x 2 x 6 cm

More Information Athletic Performance

Quercetin is a plant-based antioxidant called a flavonoid.  By definition, all antioxidants function to combat free radicals, molecules that are a by-product of oxygen consumption and destructive on a cellular level.  Since athletes consume more oxygen they may be at a greater risk for cumulative free radical damage, typically in the form of DNA alteration which has the potential to lead to a whole host of diseases.  Thus, supplementing with a flavonoid like quercetin can promote the long term health of athletes.

As an antioxidant, quercetin also has anti-inflammatory properties.  Typically it inhibits the response of macrophages and neutrophils, two types of white blood cells.  Inflammation can slow recovery, limit fitness gains, and even cause overuse injuries.  By better managing post-exercise inflammation with a quercetin supplement, you can recover faster, enhance your training adaptations, perform better in workouts and competitions, and possibly avoid injuries.

Finally, beyond its antioxidant properties, Quercetin has been shown to improve endurance and performance in weekend warriors and elite athletes alike.  A study conducted in 2010 on healthy, active but untrained college students gave subjects a placebo or quercetin drink for seven days before a stationary bike ride where participants rode to fatigue.  Seven days of quercetin feedings were associated with a statistically significant  increase in VO2max (maximum volume of oxygen an athlete can use), 3.9% vs. placebo, along with a substantial (13.2% vs, placebo) increase in ride time to fatigue.(1)  A 2006 study on elite cyclists showed similar results in athletic performance.  Two groups were given antioxidants, one group with added quercetin, one without, over the course of six weeks before a 30 km time trial.  Those who supplemented with quercetin showed an improvement in their times by 3.1% over their baseline time, with average and relative power higher in the quercetin group.(2)

A potential mechanism for the gains seen in the previous studies is quercetin’s ability to enhance mitochondrial production in the muscle and brain.  Mitochondria are the “powerplants” of cells and produce ATP (adenosine triphosphate), the energy currency for all cellular activity. Studies on mice have shown that after feeding mice quercetin for seven weeks, markers of mitochondrial genesis (PGC-1α, SIRT1, mtDNA, Cyt. C) significantly increased in the brain and in the soleus (lower calf) muscle.  The quercetin mice also displayed significant gains in run time to fatigue and voluntary wheel running activity.(3)  The consequence for athletes is more mitochondria in the brain and muscle may enhance mental and physical energy.  This means quercetin may not only increase your endurance but your willingness to be active as well.  

(1) Davis, J. M., Carlstedt, C. J., Chen, S., Carmichael, M. D., & Murphy, E. A. (2010). The dietary flavonoid quercetin increases VO(2max) and endurance capacity. International Journal of Sport Nutrition and Exercise Metabolism, 20(1), 56-62.

(2) MacRae, H. S., & Mefferd, K. M. (2006). Dietary antioxidant supplementation combined with quercetin improves cycling time trial performance. International Journal of Sport Nutrition and Exercise Metabolism, 16(4), 405-419.

(3) Davis, J. M., Murphy, E. A., Carmichael, M. D., & Davis, B. (2009). Quercetin increases brain and muscle mitochondrial biogenesis and exercise tolerance. American Journal of Physiology.Regulatory, Integrative and Comparative Physiology, 296(4), R1071-7.

More Information Natural Energy

Quercetin is a type of plant-based antioxidant called a flavonoid, that can be found in tea and the skins of red apples, red onions, berries and grapes.  However, these dietary sources have relatively low levels of quercetin.  For example, a large red apple only has 10 mg, and the studied benefits of quercetin have come from consuming 1000 mg/day.  Thus, supplementing is the only feasible way to consume high levels of quercetin.  

Quercetin can boost energy by enhancing mitochondrial production in the muscle and brain.  Mitochondria are the “powerplants” of cells and produce ATP (adenosine triphosphate), the energy currency for all cellular activity. Studies on mice have shown that after feeding quercetin for seven weeks, markers of mitochondrial genesis (PGC-1α, SIRT1, mtDNA, Cyt. C) significantly increased in the brain and in the soleus (lower calf) muscle.  The quercetin mice also displayed significant gains in run time to fatigue and voluntary wheel running activity.(1) The consequence in humans is that more mitochondria in the brain and muscle could lead to enhanced mental and physical energy.  This means quercetin may not only increase your endurance but your willingness to be active as well.  

Quercetin also operates as an anti-inflammatory to reduce fatigue.  Low-grade inflammation is now known to play a role in almost every chronic disease as well as in acute conditions.  Newer evidence also links pro-inflammatory markers, like cytokines and c-reactive protein(CRP), to fatigue.(2)  A 2007 study demonstrated that quercetin supplementation inhibited cytokines associated with allergic inflammatory diseases including: rheumatoid arthritis, asthma, and sinusitis.(3)  A 2008 study by Michigan State University of over 8,000 human subjects also showed that those individuals who consumed more flavonoids in their diets, had lower levels of CRP.  Of those flavonoids, quercetin was at the top of the list for its ability to protect against high levels of CRP.(4)  These studies indicate that quercetin can indeed fight inflammation and thus fatigue while supporting your general health.

(1) Davis, J. M., Murphy, E. A., Carmichael, M. D., & Davis, B. (2009). Quercetin increases brain and muscle mitochondrial biogenesis and exercise tolerance. American Journal of Physiology.Regulatory, Integrative and Comparative Physiology, 296(4), R1071-7.

(2) Raison, C. L., Lin, J. M., & Reeves, W. C. (2009). Association of peripheral inflammatory markers with chronic fatigue in a population-based sample. Brain, Behavior, and Immunity, 23(3), 327-337.

(3) Min, Y. D., Choi, C. H., Bark, H., Son, H. Y., Park, H. H., Lee, S., . . . Kim, S. H. (2007). Quercetin inhibits expression of inflammatory cytokines through attenuation of NF-kappaB and p38 MAPK in HMC-1 human mast cell line. Inflammation Research : Official Journal of the European Histamine Research Society …[Et Al.], 56(5), 210-215.

(4) Chun, O. K., Chung, S. J., Claycombe, K. J., & Song, W. O. (2008). Serum C-reactive protein concentrations are inversely associated with dietary flavonoid intake in U.S. adults. The Journal of Nutrition, 138(4), 753-760.

Attributes

  • Color (in powder form)
    • Light tan to tan
  • Product Flavor Profile (mixed with 8-10 oz. water)
    • Neutral tasting
  • Suggested Flavor Pairings
    •  Any: Pairs well with all of our 12 flavor offerings. Choose your favorite!
  • Alternative Uses: Add to…
    • Cold Beverages (juice, milk, iced tea, etc.)
    • Sports Drinks
    • Smoothies
    • Yogurt

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